Noticeboard

Measles

Measles is on the increase with outbreaks in England and Wales. The MMR vaccine protects against 3 serious illnesses: measles, mumps and rubella (german measles)

Staff Vacancy

We have a vacancy for a Medical Receptionist, 21 hours, please see further details here and an application form can be found here

Awaiting a Hospital appointment or wanting a result?

Please do not ring the surgery if you are under the hospital already to chase a result or a hospital appointment. If you have not heard from the hospital about a planned appointment or feel you may need to amend or request your appointment is brought forward please contact the hospital directly. You can contact the main hospital switchboard and ask to speak to your consultants secretary. The practice has no other way of doing this other than the above and you will be directed to do this. 

Joint Injection Service

We are pleased to confirm that this service is now fully operational again as we (hopefully) move away from the pandemic. Please contact the surgery if you feel you need a joint injection.

Sick Notes Extensions

 If you require an extension to a sick note please order this via the NHS App where possible.

 For instructions on how to do this please visit:

 www.nottsnhsapp.nhs.uk/sicknote

Repeat Prescription Queries

If you have a Repeat Prescription Query then please contact your pharmacy in the first instance. If you then still need to contact the practice then please fill in the ‘Repeat Prescription Queries’ consultation on the NHS App and PKB.

 

Into Twitter?

Why not follow Nottingham West Primary Care Network https://twitter.com/NottmWestPCN for the latest local updates on health and wellbeing?

Respect your Surgery and Staff

Over the last couple of months we have noticed an increase in the aggression and use of abusive language our staff are receiving.

We would like to remind our patients that we are working very hard to meet the needs of all our patients and any form of aggression, abuse or use of bad language towards our team will not be tolerated.

If you are unhappy or have any concerns we would request that these are raised in the appropriate manner. 

Thank you. Contact us here.

The EPCC Team will continue to wear face masks, and other PPE as required, to protect our patients and our colleagues and prevent possible infections.

We politely request that patients coming into the surgery continue to wear a mask also please.

Church Walk and Church Street Sites

Our doors are now open and so there is now no need to ring the bell beforehand, but we do still need to manage footfall in the surgery to keep everyone safe. Can we please ask that you do not arrive too early for your appointment and use the external prescription request box at the side of the Church Walk site instead of bringing this to reception.

Over the Counter Medications

A GP, nurse or pharmacist will generally not give you a prescription for over the counter (OTC) medicines for a range of minor health conditions, though there are some exceptions.

You may still be prescribed a medicine for a condition on the list (shown below) if:

  • you need treatment for a long-term condition, for example regular pain relief for chronic arthritis or inflammatory bowel disease
  • you need treatment for more complex forms of minor illnesses, for example migraines that are very bad and where OTC medicines do not work
  • you need an OTC medicine to treat a side effect of a prescription medicine or symptom of another illness, such as constipation when taking certain painkillers
  • the medicine has a licence that does not allow the product to be sold to certain groups of patients. This could include babies, children or women who are pregnant or breastfeeding
  • the person prescribing thinks that a patient cannot treat themselves, for example because of mental health problems

This is because of government policy to reduce the amount of money the NHS spends on prescriptions for treating minor conditions that usually get better on their own.

Instead, OTC medicines are available to buy in a pharmacy or supermarket. Find your nearest pharmacy.

The team of health professionals at your local pharmacy can offer help and clinical advice to manage minor health concerns. If your symptoms suggest it's more serious, they'll ensure you get the care you need.

You can buy OTC medicines for any of these conditions:

  • acute sore throat
  • minor burns and scalds
  • conjunctivitis
  • mild cystitis
  • coughs, colds and nasal congestion
  • mild dry skin
  • cradle cap
  • mild irritant dermatitis
  • dandruff
  • mild to moderate hay fever
  • diarrhoea (adults)
  • dry eyes and sore tired eyes
  • mouth ulcers
  • earwax
  • nappy rash
  • excessive sweating
  • infant colic
  • sunburn
  • infrequent cold sores of the lip
  • sun protection
  • infrequent constipation
  • teething or mild toothache
  • infrequent migraine
  • threadworms
  • insect bites and stings
  • travel sickness
  • mild acne
  • warts and verrucas
  • haemorrhoids (piles)
  • oral thrush
  • head lice
  • prevention of tooth decay
  • indigestion and heartburn
  • ringworm or athlete's foot
  • minor pain, discomfort and fever (such as aches and sprains, headache, period pain, and back pain)

For information on how these conditions are treated, look up your condition in the health A to Z.

Probiotics, Vitamins and Minerals

GPs, nurses or pharmacists will also generally no longer prescribe probiotics or some vitamins and minerals. You can get the vitamins and minerals you need from eating a healthy, varied and balanced diet, or buy them at a pharmacy or supermarket.

Why has the NHS reduced these prescriptions?

Before these changes in 2018, the NHS spent around £569 million a year on prescriptions for medicines that can be bought from a pharmacy or supermarket, such as paracetamol.

By reducing the amount it spends on OTC medicines, the NHS can give priority to treatments for people with more serious conditions, such as cancer, diabetes and mental health problems.

Information taken from the NHS UK website

 
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